Wasp Sting Written by Erica Roth Medically Reviewed by Steven Kim, MD on August 24, 2015 healthline.com
“..Wasp stings are common, especially during the warmer months when people are outside for longer periods of time. Wasp stings can be uncomfortable, but most people recover quickly and without complications.

Wasps, like bees and hornets, are equipped with a stinger as a means of self-defense. A wasp’s stinger contains venom (poisonous substance) that’s transmitted to humans during a sting. While a bee can only sting once because its stinger becomes stuck in the skin of its victim, a wasp can sting more than once during an attack. Wasp stingers remain intact.

However, even without a lodged stinger, wasp venom can cause significant pain and irritation….”

TREATMENT

Natural Remedies for Bee, Wasp, and Hornet Stings

Written by Sarah C. Corriher
Category: Reports
Published: November 12, 2009 healthwyze.org
“..a stinger is left embedded in the body, then remove it as soon as possible. This should be the first step. Use whatever tools are immediately available to dig it out. You could use a knife, credit card, pliers, tweezers, or a needle. Sterilize the tool if possible, but do not waste time. For maximum absorption, clean the area with soap and water before applying remedies, otherwise the oils on the skin will repel them.

Wasp and Hornet Stings

Vinegar – Wasp and hornet venom are powerful alkalines. Use an acid such as vinegar to neutralize them. It can be applied via a piece of cloth or bandaging. Make sure to keep the stings soaked for at least 15 minutes. Some vinegar will absorb through the skin, and it should greatly help eliminate the discomfort…”
Healthy Outlook-
How to Treat Bee and Wasp Stings—and When to See a Doctor

By Dr. Thomas McCoy cchealth.org
“.. All kidding aside, bee stings can actually pose a serious health threat. If someone is allergic to bees, a sting can be a life-threatening situation. In the vast majority of cases, though, bee or wasp stings are not a cause for concern—they usually just cause some pain, swelling, redness and itching at the site of the sting.

Dealing with a bee or wasp sting will obviously be different depending on your sensitivity. But let’s begin with the most common scenario in which a person has a mild reaction. The first thing you need to do is remove the stinger if you were stung by a bee (wasps don’t leave stingers behind). You can get it out with your fingers, tweezers or even the edge of a credit card. Remove it as quickly as you can in order to limit the amount of venom released.

Next, wash the affected area with soap and water. Once you’ve done that, apply ice and take an anti-inflammatory medication like ibuprofen to limit the swelling. If the affected area gets itchy—a fairly common side effect—you can apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to get some relief. The pain and discomfort should go away in a few hours. With a more moderate reaction, swelling around the site of the sting may persist for a few days and even grow larger. ..”

How to Treat Bee and Wasp Stings


“Published on Jun 20, 2014

http://www.waysandhow.com
This video is a helpful tutorial on how to treat bee and wasp stings, watch it now for details.

ven though bee and wasp stings are common, they should not be taken lightly. These stings can be mildly painful at best but fatal at worst. They can cause severe allergic reactions, depending on the type of venom in the stinger. Here’s how to treat bee and wasp stings.

Watch our New Uploads 7 days Earlier, Now on Vessel: http://www.vessel.com/WaysAndHow..”

Sal: I got stung by a wasp this afternoon at work when I was coming out of the workplace bus garage..

I would wash it with soap and cold water and would put in a way to push the stinger or bite out (like milking a cow). I then put rubbing alcohol and then vinegar.

Any other tips, suggestions, stories, etc..?

Good News Medical
https://www.facebook.com/groups/339628506163473/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s